DCR Politics: Trump vetoes defense bill, tying up holiday override votes in Congress.☕☕☕

Ayyyeee… What’s Goodie Everyone. So I got some tea and it involves Trump’s veto on a defense bill.

Trump vetoed a $741 billion defense spending bill, setting up what is expected to be the first successful veto override of his presidency during his last weeks in office.

The House and Senate each passed the defense bill earlier this month with strong veto proof majorities, rejecting Trump’s insistence that it be changed to meet his oftentimes shifting demands. Both chambers are expected to sustain the two thirds majorities needed to override the president’s veto, despite pledges from House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R.CA.) and other stalwart Trump allies not to cross the president’s wishes.

In his veto message, Trump complained that the legislation includes “provisions that fail to respect our veterans’ and military’s history” a reference to instructions that the Defense Department change the names of installations commemorating Confederate leaders. He also scorned the bill as a “ ‘gift’ to China and Russia,” slammed the bill for restricting his ability to draw down the presence of U.S. troops in certain foreign outposts, and excoriated lawmakers for failing to include an unrelated repeal of a law granting liability protections to technology companies that Trump has accused, without significant evidence.

Congress has until Sunday, January 3, at 11:59 a.m. to override the veto and force the defense bill to become law. If they do nothing, it will expire along with the end of the two year congressional session at noon on that day. The House is planning to reconvene on Monday to hold a veto override vote, while the Senate is expected back in Washington on Tuesday and will hold its veto override vote thereafter.

Trump’s insistence that the defense bill become a vehicle for a repeal of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects companies from bearing legal responsibility for content third parties post on their websites, became a breaking point between the president and congressional Republicans during the final days of negotiations over the legislation. Trump views its repeal as a way to punish social media companies like Facebook, Google and Twitter.

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